Believe in the Impossible

Posted: 13th July 2010 by Glenda (and Jack) in motivation
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Like many other girls, Kiera Brinkley wanted to be a dancer–but Kiera has no arms or legs. At the age of two years old a rampant bacterial infection (meningococcal disease) caused doctors to have to amputate most of both legs, her left arm at the elbow and the right arm above the wrist. When the little girl left the hospital, her mother knew things would not be easy but said she “could not let disability limit Kiera’s future.”

“She doesn’t have any boundaries, just hurdles” says her mom, Elesha Boyd. “Life for her wasn’t going to be: ‘You can’t do that.'” Her mom says Kiera’s only different on the outside and treated her as a normal kid, just shorter.

Kiera loved music and when she wanted to be a part of the school’s dance routine, her mother encouraged her and sewed taps to the bottoms of her pants.

Later she won a lottery to attend DaVinci Arts Middle School. Kiera never treated herself as anyone different. She swayed to music with her whole body in rhythm. With exuberance she would get out her wheel chair and do cartwheels.

Later in highschool “Shriners’ staffers contacted the Dream Factory, a national organization that grants wishes to critically and chronically ill children. The group invited Kiera to live out one of her dreams: A trip with her family to New York City for a Julliard workshop.” Here she was able to see one of her choreographed routines that she envisioned with reaches of full arms and legs extended danced by an ensemble of students. She said she bawled at being able to see what she could only imagine doing.

Kiera is still involved in dance and believing in “impossible” dreams. She wants to be a prenatal nurse but always keep dance in her life–maybe be a dance teacher. She’s an inspiration to everyone who sees her.

Her mother never told her, “you can’t do that.” 

What a difference we can make in people’s lives by the words we use.

To see a full article and be completely inspired, check out   http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2010/02/despite_losing_part_of_each_li.html .

 

~ Glenda  

Age Is No Reason to Quit

Posted: 8th July 2010 by Glenda (and Jack) in motivation
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 “Education has no end,” Akasease Kofi Boakye Yiadom told CNN. “As far as your brain can work alright, your eyes can see alright, and your ears can hear alright, if you go to school you can learn.” The World War II veteran entered school at age 96 and earned his business degree in 2009 at the age of 99.

Though salaries are much higher in other countries, Yiadom says that government taxes helped pay for his education, and he believes you should contribute back to your own country who helped you. “Proud of his hard work and survival through hardship, Boakye Yiadom think graduates should stay in the country,” from the CNN World, April 2, 2010 Inside Africa.

All it appears that Boakye Yiadom is thinking about is how to give back to his fellow-man–though at 99 years old, I don’t think that’s what most people are thinking about.

He’s been an inspiration to far younger graduates to stay and help Ghana prosper instead of leaving to accept higher salaries in other countries.

I’m just guessing, but it seems to me that his determination to help others and never to stop learning has helped make him younger than many who are half his age.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could all have his determination and commitment?

~ Glenda  

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Don’t Fight the Inevitable

Posted: 5th July 2010 by Glenda (and Jack) in motivation
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“Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.”  

                                      – Robert C. Gallagher

It’s strange how many people do fight change. Maybe the security in the known is far more rewarding to them than the intrigue and excitement of new experiences.

~ Glenda  

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Your To-Do List

Posted: 1st July 2010 by Glenda (and Jack) in motivation
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My To Do List:  write a book, paint the house, clean the litter box, fix supper. . . .  

from Clipart.com

 

What kind of to-do list is this?       

Don’t write a task down as a to-do list item that takes weeks, months, or years to complete. Those items need to be listed on a long-range goal list.       

When you write your to-do list, you need to list items that can be finished in the time you have to complete your list– whether that’s 15 minutes or 6 hours.  You need the immediate gratification of getting to-do lists completed so that the same to-do list doesn’t get carried over day after day, week after week.       

~ Glenda  

Goal Setting 101

Posted: 28th June 2010 by Glenda (and Jack) in motivation
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“If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time.”

              from the Sept 22 devotional in the Daily Walk Bible

~ Glenda 

Stop Whining about Your Failures

Posted: 24th June 2010 by Glenda (and Jack) in motivation
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Whining never helped anyone get what they want (unless it’s a toddler pulling on the hem of your pants). Whining is a waste of time and resources.

Plus, it’s humongously irritating to other people’s ears! They usually want to say “shut up and get a life” but are too polite and simply stay silent.

Save the energy and time you use to whine to actually do something.

~ Glenda

Your Success Is What You Make It

Posted: 21st June 2010 by Glenda (and Jack) in motivation
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“No one can cheat you out of ultimate success but yourself.” 

 — Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1803-1882, American Poet and Essayist

I like this quote because it’s so easy to fall into the blame game of if only this or that. Everyone will have setbacks. Plus, maybe you are looking for success in the wrong direction. There are countless areas of success. Open your eyes. You may be heading in the right direction but don’t realize it.

~ Glenda    

www.WordWardrobe.com 

www.365DaysOfFunInMarriage.com  (find fun in marriage here)

 

Three Feet from Gold  by Sharon L. Leehter and Greg S. Reid is an excellent book for reminding everyone not to give up. If you give up, you may discover later you were “just this close.” The book Three Feet from Gold begins with the purported true story of a gold miner named R. U. Darby who gave up, sold all his equipment to a junk dealer, and later found out he was only three feet from one of the richest gold mines ever found.

Three Feet from Gold is a fictionalized work parodying the 1937 book by Napoleon Hill, Think and Grow Rich. Whether you agree with Napoleon Hill’s concepts or not, this fictionalized account of Three Feet from Gold provides numerous examples of how people too easily become discouraged and give up because the way seems too hard.

God may be telling you to do something, but he’s never guaranteed the journey will be easy nor the way without a lot of bumps or boulders in the road. People often assume these protrusions in the road as a “sign” from God: “Oops, must not have been what I was supposed to do.”

Persevering builds strength. Anything of importance takes time. Don’t let a few bumps and boulders in the road confuse you into thinking you are on the wrong road.

Keep at it! 

~ Glenda   

Ozzy Osbourne’s New Album, Scream

Posted: 16th June 2010 by Glenda (and Jack) in motivation
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 We all agree that life doesn’t wait for us. In the lyrics of his new album, even Ozzy Osbourne thinks time is rushing by.

It’s interesting how I’m always talking about making every moment count. Ozzy Osbourne has brand new lyrics saying almost the same thing. According to an article by David Kreps in Rolling Stone magazine (appearing on-line in Music on Today segment) Ozzy has lyrics on his new Scream album out June 22, 2010 with a song “Life Can’t Wait.”

“Every second you throw away, every second of every day, don’t get caught in a myriad, because life won’t wait for you,” Ozzy sings, urging listeners to not simply watch life pass by. “Every day that you wait, you’re falling faster, no sleight of hand, no twist of fate, no ever after. When it’s gone, it’s gone, a fight to the bitter end.”

I only know a little about Ozzy Osbourne—he isn’t quite my style of entertainment or someone I like watching. Maybe it’s because I’m an animal lover but something about his antics just doesn’t agree with my personal traits. OK, being an animal lover doesn’t really have anything to do with it. And, it is wonderful how he’s agreed to let the medical community map his entire DNA. They are doing that because no one can understand how he’s still alive after all the years of his life-style choices.

However, we do seem to have a like belief in that every day does count and life doesn’t wait for you.

Yet, no matter who someone is, no matter his beliefs or lifestyle choices, it’s so sad when you hear a person say (even in lyrics) “No ever after. When it’s gone, it’s gone, a fight to the bitter end.”

Those lyrics simply aren’t true (not meaning that lyrics have to be true).

There is no end–there’s just a major stop sign and then move forward. Life can be better “after.” Believing in and following Christ provides followers in him with so much to look forward to–so much that will be better than anything here could possibly be. For others, it’s a different story.

~ Glenda

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www.365DaysOfFunInMarriage.com

 

Art Linkletter was a person who identified his talent and used it. I’m thankful that I got to witness this first hand. He was true to his calling throughout his whole life.

In the first years of his career, he couldn’t identify anything in particular that he was good at. He assumed he was going to teach English since that was what he was majoring in. However, in his senior year of college, he noticed as a radio host that he was good at talking to people and was extremely adept at listening to people. He took those two talents and developed them into a business.

 Audiences loved him. Critics hated him (from an article appearing in his New York Times obituary:

Television critics and intellectuals found the Linkletter persona bland and his popularity unfathomable. “There is nothing greatly impressive, one way or the other, about his appearance, mannerisms, or his small talk,” one newspaper critic wrote. Another referred to his “imperishable banality.”

Fortunately Mr. Linkletter didn’t listen to his reviews and continued instead to follow his passion. He continued it until he died many decades later.

Do you listen to your reviews? Or do you follow what you feel is your calling and continue to develop it? There are no overnight successes at anything in life. 

~ Glenda